You can do it: File your taxes on time!

baby crying tax

Wah, scream, scratch. Tax season can make the best of us rip out our hair in a deadline frenzy, then hurl our bodies into a dark corner, where no one (*cough* CRA *cough*) can ever find us, ever, ever again.

Do this instead.

File and pay your taxes on time otherwise you risk serious consequences, especially if you owe the CRA money. And while the task can seem daunting at best, the CRA can be pretty reasonable, but, just like a hungry baby, they do NOT like to be ignored.

Income Tax CRA Deadlines

  • The personal income tax deadline is April 30 IF you have taxes owing. If you don’t have taxes owing, you are not required to file a return. However, we recommend that you do so anyway to get your refund and stay eligible for government benefits such as GST cheques, child tax benefits, premium assistance for MSP and Fair Pharmacare.

  • The income tax deadline for self-employed individuals is very deceiving. If you don’t owe taxes you have until June 15th to file HOWEVER if you owe taxes you need to pay them prior to April 30. without doing your tax return you have no idea what is owing, so we recommend that you file your taxes for the April 30 to avoid interest.

GST

  • Annual GST payment and filing for  incorporated companies is due March 31st, 2017

  • Annual GST payment and filing for sole proprietors is due  April 30th, 2017 despite the fact that your remittance form will say June 15 as the due date. Please see above regarding deceiving deadlines for self-employed individuals.

Employer Deadlines

  • T4’s must be filed with the CRA and given out to your employees before Feb 28, 2017, if you want to avoid late penalties, which are $25/day.

What are installments??

So you have filed your taxes and discovered that you owe the CRA a lot more money than you expected. You feel your heart sink, you cry for a while and you curse the government for ruining your life.

Just as you finally begin to accept your fate and begrudgingly drain your bank account to pay off your mammoth bill, you receive an installment notification from the CRA. This notification informs you that due to the fact that you owed the government more than $3000 on your previous tax return you are now required to make quarterly tax installment payments (pay your taxes in advance) for the current year. If this isn’t bad enough the fine print will notify you that the first payment is due right away and that failure to pay the amounts requested by their due dates will result in interest being charged.

Although not every person with a bill over $3000 will receive this notification, you should plan to receive it so that you are mentally AND financially prepared.

Important Information about Installments

  • If you DO NOT get an installment reminder, you DO NOT need to pay installments, unless you would like to voluntarily.

  • Installment payments are typically due in March, June, September, and December.

  • You will get a statement of installments paid from the CRA that you will need when you file your taxes.

  • Installment interest will be charged if you receive an installment reminder and you fail to pay the amount owing in full by the due date.

Exceptions to the Rule

If you anticipate your income for the year is going to be much lower than your previous years’ income eg. you are going on maternity leave and won’t be working for 5 months of the year.

Contact the CRA and discuss this with them. If your tax owing at the end of the year is below $3000 then you won’t be penalized for not paying the installments.

If you need help filing your income tax please don’t hesitate to contact Homeroom SBS today.

Happy tax season!

Job Alert: Looking for a fabulous bookkeeper!

career search, job search, bookkeeping, quickbooks, small business, income tax, vancouver bookkeeping, vancouver careers, hiring Vancouver

Riding on the back of the shear excitement of another successful tax season, we knocked down a chunk of the back wall and increased our office space by an entire room. The Lady in Charge Teya finally gets the much needed privacy of her own office, and we get more legroom.

Yes, more room for awesome!

So, what does that mean for you?

We are looking for a fabulous part-time bookkeeper to join our growing  team of six, and take over the lonely, soft, leathery chair with your name on it.

Our hiring process is simple. We don’t bother with resumes, and wasting paper.


Do this instead:

  1. Click the pink button below
  2. Follow the instructions carefully

Reply here by answering the following questions:

  • Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
  • If you could be an animal what would you be and why?
  • How many years experience do you have working with Quickbooks?
  • Why do you want to work at Homeroom?

Homeroom Small Business Solutions is a growing, fast-paced tax preparation and bookkeeping company based in Vancouver. We pride ourselves on providing quality customer service, accurate and honest bookkeeping and great employee benefits.

We love what we do and want to find additional team members who are passionate about providing great customer service, set and achieve high standards of work, pay close attention to detail and who are loyal, motivated and passionate about life and business.

In return we will offer you a stable, flexible, supportive workplace with opportunities for growth.

We currently have a part-time position available, with a potential for full-time, for a qualified bookkeeper starting mid May.

Salary + Benefits will depend on experience.

We also pay commission for any clients you bring to the company.

Must have:

  • Min 1 years experience using Quickbooks Desktop
  • Strong understanding of GST and PST
  • Strong understanding and ability to troubleshoot bank reconciliations
  • Patience to train and answer questions from junior bookkeepers on our team
  • Experience processing payroll
  • Excellent customer service skills
  • Excellent communication skills
  • Ability to quickly learn and adapt to changing technology
  • Ability to work well within a team environment
  • A willingness to learn new bookkeeping procedures
  • An optimistic, friendly & supportive attitude
  • Ability to enter data in a timely and accurate manner

Bonus:

  • Experience using Client Track or similar databases
  • Experience using Quickbooks Online
  • Ability to generate and read reports

If you believe you are the perfect fit please send us an email answering the questions at the top of the ad. No phone calls or drop ins.

Job Type:

Part-time

Required experience:

  • Accounting: 1 year
  • Bookkeeping: 1 year

 

Tax tip: Claiming childcare expenses

Ryan Gossling, income tax, childcare expenses, child care expenses

A lot of new mamas (and dadas) come to Homeroom unsure about what childcare expenses they can and can’t claim come tax time. 

Below, we look at eligible childcare costs, the amount you can deduct and which parent claims the costs. 

So, what constitutes a childcare expense?

Childcare expenses are amounts you or another person paid to have someone look after an eligible child so that you or the other person could:

  • carry on a business either alone or as an active partner
  • earn income from employment
  • attend school under the conditions identified under Educational program
  • carry on research or similar work, for which you or the other person received a grant

The child must have lived with you or the other person at the time the transaction incurred for the expense to qualify. Usually, you can only deduct payments for services provided in Canada by a Canadian resident. See other situations for exceptions.

What are eligible childcare expenses?

  • Daycare/ day nursery schools or caregivers providing childcare services. An official childcare expense receipt must be provided.
  • If you employ a nanny, those costs are deductible. Contact us if you need help with payroll source deductions here.
  • Boarding school or overnight sports schools/ camps where lodging is involved (see note in Part A of Form T778)
  • Day camp/ sports school expenses where the primary goal of the camp is to care for childrenNote: An institution offering a sports study program is not a sports school.

Who claims the childcare costs?

When the child lives with both parents, the parent with the lower net income (or zero net income) must claim the expense deduction. The supporting parent with the higher income may claim a deduction only during the period in which the lower income spouse or common-law partner is mentally or physically infirm, confined to a bed or a wheelchair, attending full- time at a secondary school or a designated educational institution or incarcerated in a correctional facility.

The amount that can be claimed for childcare is subject to special rules when the lower income spouse or common- law partner is in part-time attendance at a designated educational institution. Special rules also apply for single parents and those who have separated during the year or are divorced.

How much can you deduct?

You can deduct up to $8,000 annually for each child who is aged six or under at the end of the year, and up to $5,000 for each child aged seven to 15 at any time in the year.

This limit goes up to $11,000 annually for each child who is eligible for the disability tax credit (see topic 80). Also, the total deduction can’t exceed two-thirds of the salary or business income of the parent who is required to claim the deduction. However, it’s limited by the actual amounts paid in the year for childcare.

Still have questions? Comment below for a quick response, or call us at 604-739-9536.